Career opportunities in digital marketing

Throughout learning about Internet/Digital Marketing, I realized there are so many topics and areas of interest. I wanted to research what kind of jobs are in this field, what the responsibilities are, and their salary. Of course there are many more jobs, and different variations on titles, but this is a small sample of possible careers.

The first job is an SEO Manager. These people are responsible for generating traffic to the company’s website[1], evaluating performance of SEO strategies[2], researching appropriate keywords[3], and more. An actual job listing from LXV Outdoor on Indeed stated they want their SEO/Digital Marketing Manager to “develop and implement strategies to achieve maximum ROI in paid search campaigns[4]” and “develop, manage and optimize digital marketing campaigns, continually improving online presence. The median salary of an SEO manager as of October 2016 was $64,358.[5]

Next is a Social Media Manager. Their responsibilities include increasing brand’s presence on social media platforms and engaging with customers.[6] A job listing from Simplehuman on Indeed listed some responsibilities as increasing engagement and traffic to their website, measuring success of social campaigns, and keeping up-to-date on social media and technology trends.[7] Their median salary is $46,984.[8]

Although the LXV Outdoor job title lumped SEO and Digital Marketing together, a Forbes article differentiates the two. According to the article, Digital Marketing Managers plan a little bit of everything for online strategies, like SEO, social media, email, and mobile.[9] They have a median salary of $62,352.[10]

The last job is a Digital Marketing Analyst. They track success of digital marketing campaigns using data-driven methods.[11] A job posting for Torrid wants their digital marketing analyst to create and launch digital marketing campaigns and optimize paid and organic search strategy, among others.[12] Their median salary is $58,970.[13]

 

[1] http://www.forbes.com/sites/steveolenski/2015/12/09/want-a-job-with-great-work-life-balance-choose-a-career-in-digital-marketing/#2f359ba21b16

[2] http://www.payscale.com/research/US/Job=Search_Engine_Optimization_(SEO)_Manager/Salary

[3] Ibid

[4] http://www.indeed.com/cmp/LXV-Outdoor/jobs/SEO-Digital-Marketing-Manger-d0aba47d9c9f9b5f?q=SEO+Manager

[5] Ibid

[6] Forbes.com

[7] http://www.indeed.com/viewjob?jk=068e6313a23c3547&q=social+media+manager&l=California&tk=1b3dsrjp11fsb7s7&from=web&advn=2572372182760196&sjdu=OwPa1jmtR5CzwLhcQsXLpobxkRqiEUyoXcY620O_4uWXyqN4YBtTptvUevTLoLrGcrtO8LOVPwu7rq9TIMrMzvdwV_iFlcn_3zWOilkiwyo&pub=4a1b367933fd867b19b072952f68dceb

[8] http://www.payscale.com/research/US/Job=Social_Media_Manager/Salary

[9] Forbes.com

[10] http://www.payscale.com/research/US/Job=Digital_Marketing_Manager/Salary

[11] Forbes.com

[12] http://www.indeed.com/viewjob?jk=a1c51c1f2b0ba6c6&q=title%3A(Digital+Marketing+Analyst)&l=Fullerton,+California&tk=1b3dvnll3aetra06&from=ifa&utm_source=publisher&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=de_noemail&pub=97194ac1ffdadc3cbd74f495ef13b3370cace3277f6b99df

[13] http://www.payscale.com/research/US/Job=Digital_Marketing_Analyst/Salary

The Google Zoo? Panda, Penguin, and Hummingbird

While researching new topics to write about, I kept seeing Panda, Penguin, and Hummingbird, and had no idea what they meant. I wanted to find out what they were and share that information on this blog.

Panda

Google Panda is part of an algorithm regarding quality of content on a website.[1] For sites with high quality content, they will be ranked higher in search results, while sites with low quality content will be ranked lower.[2] Many believe this was a way to eliminate “content farms,” where websites would publish a large amount of low quality content.[3] Some other important characteristics of Panda are that it does not target user-generated content and it does not require a specific word count.[4]

Penguin

Google Penguin is an algorithm that targets low quality links and ranks them lower in search results.[5] Websites that engaged in previously-accepted practices like link building will be affected by Penguin, therefore need to adjust their strategy.[6] Penguin only targets incoming links, and websites should be cautious of seemingly high quality links like .edu or even the Huffington Post.[7] Some of those sites sell links, which Google will deem as low quality.[8]

Hummingbird

Google Hummingbird is an algorithm that aims to understand user search queries better.[9] Websites with content that answer questions the user is asking will rank higher.[10] Additionally, Google wants to provide the best results for longer queries, and will try to provide an internal page on a website that answers the question, instead of providing the homepage.[11] Jennifer Slegg of Search Engine Journal advises websites to make their content easy to read and can answer both short and long user queries.[12]

[1] https://www.searchenginejournal.com/seo-guide/panda-penguin-hummingbird/

[2] Ibid

[3] Ibid

[4] Ibid

[5] Ibid

[6] Ibid

[7] Ibid

[8] Ibid

[9] Ibid

[10] Ibid

[11] Ibid

[12] Ibid

How to advertise on Pinterest and Tumblr

Although Pinterest and Tumblr are fairly large social media sites, they do not really scream “ad revenue.” Personally, I had no idea how one can advertise on Tumblr before I wrote this post, and Pinterest ads are not as obvious as traditional ones.

Pinterest

To my surprise, the average Pin is 100 times more shareable and spreadable than the average Tweet.[1] Additionally, it was revealed that bloggers receive a large portion of their traffic from Pinterest.[2] Now thinking about it, most links I follow from Pinterest are to blogs, whether it be DIY projects, recipes, or makeup tutorials. .

Here are a few tips from bloggers:

  • Post frequently throughout the day. This allows businesses to maintain their presence on the social media platform.[3]
  • Support other influencers.[4]
  • Have a branded board.[5]
  • Use long images. One blogger stated posting longer images, as in size, get more attention and can increase repins. [6]
  • Join group-boards for extra exposure.[7]

Tumblr

Tumblr is similar to Pinterest in that mostly visuals are posted.  With that being said, users are more likely to respond to photos, videos, and GIFs.[8] According to an article on We Are Social Media, 70% of consumers have a more positive perception of a brand after seeing a sponsored post on Tumblr.[9] Sponsored posts are also likely to look “native,” meaning they look like a regular post[10], which can be good if users are put off by paid ads.

Here are types of paid Tumblr posts:

  • Sponsored web posts: these are simply posts that appear in a news feed on a desktop or laptop.[11]
  • Sponsored mobile posts: these are the same as web posts, but on a mobile device.[12]
  • Sponsored trending blogs: if you submit three representative posts, they are considered trending.[13]
  • Sponsored spotlight: Tumblr can choose your post to display as a spotlight.[14]

[1] https://blog.hootsuite.com/using-pinterest-for-business-secrets-from-top-bloggers/

[2] Ibid

[3] Ibid

[4] Ibid

[5] Ibid

[6] Ibid

[7] Ibid

[8] http://wersm.com/the-complete-guide-to-remarkable-advertising-on-tumblr/

[9] Ibid

[10] http://www.dummies.com/business/marketing/social-media-marketing/how-to-advertise-your-brand-on-tumblr/

[11] Ibid

[12] Ibid

[13] Ibid

[14] Ibid

Yelp as a marketing tool

I use Yelp on a weekly-basis, and I never really thought of it as a marketing tool that companies can control. However, there are a few articles I came across that suggest increasing your business’ presence on and use of Yelp. A very useful article I will be using for this post is from vivial.net. I want to summarize the advice given to marketers and give my opinions on those methods as an average consumer.

They state that 44% of customers base their decision after reading reviews.[1] I am definitely one of those people. If a business has under 4 stars, I am unlikely to bother going there. Additionally, I care about the Yelp page as a whole, like business information. If there is no website linked, I usually do not trust the business, therefore I will not go there.

One piece of advice the article gives is to post your own photos[2], which as a consumer, I partially disagree with. If I go on Yelp and look at pictures, usually for a restaurant, I want to see what customers ate, not a photoshoot the business did to make their food look better. Another situation is for hair salons. Just the other day, I was on Yelp looking at salons in San Diego. One of them was obviously the owner and only employee. A majority of the photos were ones she had taken, and I was a little off-put because she can choose to show what goes well.

The last advice the article gives is to respond to reviews, both positive and negative.[3] They state that 33% of negative reviews turn positive when you respond to them.[4] I have occasionally seen people update a negative review because a manager or customer service rep contacted them. I have definitely seen employees respond harshly to reviewers, and although reviewers can be harsh too, customers are always right.

[1] https://vivial.net/blog/how-to-use-yelp-marketing-to-promote-your-business-slideshare/

[2] Ibid

[3] Ibid

[4] Ibid

Google Dislikes Mobile Popup Ads as Much as We Do

Websites can no longer focus on optimizing search results for desktops, they need to optimize for mobile, too. Starting in 2014, Google added “mobile-friendly” to their search results ranking,[1] so marketers are continuously updating the way they optimize their websites. Amanda Zantal-Wiener from HubSpot has a great article on the changes Google is making starting January 10, 2017.

Those annoying popup ads, that I don’t think anyone likes, may be disappearing. I think everyone has experienced these ads that pop up when you were about to click something, so then you end up clicking on something else. Or you tap 15 times on that little “x” they give you in the corner.

Google calls these “interstitials,” and they will affect the way websites rank.[2] Websites with those popup ads are considered to negatively affect user experience, therefore Google will rank them lower in search results.

There are criteria that the popup ads have to fall under in order to be affected:

  • Showing a popup that covers the majority of the page, either immediately after they land on the page, or after scrolling.[3]
  • Showing a popup that the user has to close before being able to read the content.[4]
  • Showing a popup above the fold, with the main content underneath.[5]

Popups that verify a user’s age or notify the website’s use of cookies will not be affected by the change.[6] These changes will ultimately benefit users, but could hinder marketers who rely on these ads for revenue. Amanda offers advice to those marketers:

  • Remove the popup ads, unless it is a legal requirement.[7]
  • Determine a new source for ad revenue.[8]
  • Find ways to advertise without affecting user experience.[9]
  • Make your content valuable to the user.[10]

Amanda argues that forcing companies to re-think their advertising may allow marketers to consider their users’ experiences more.[11] Ultimately, this change is great for both users and marketers. It will improve user experience and create innovation within companies.

[1] https://blog.hubspot.com/marketing/google-pop-up-mobile-marketing#sm.00001xnp4xer03fd1r4l2y7ddu476

[2] Ibid

[3] Ibid

[4] Ibid

[5] Ibid

[6] Ibid

[7] Ibid

[8] Ibid

[9] Ibid

[10] Ibid

[11] Ibid

Is a short attention span a disadvantage?

As I mentioned in my previous blog post, “Mulit-taskers and Multi-screeners”, my ability to focus on one thing at a time is suffering because of technology and the Internet. In recent years, it has been concluded that humans have an attention span of 8 seconds, which is largely due to smartphones.[1] Even though this sounds bad, I wondered if the ability to multi-task has benefits. I did some research and found a few arguments about the advantages of shorter attention spans.

The first argument is that shorter attention spans allow us to draw the most out of our lives, because we can get information faster.[2] If a website is loading too slowly, we will go to another one, which eliminates time wasted.[3] Another argument is that because our world is so high-tech and fast-paced, it encourages more innovation.[4] Even though it seems we have all we could want in a smartphone or laptop, there are constantly new inventions coming out, because people want more.

My favorite argument, mostly because it makes me feel better about myself, is that our attention spans are not shorter, they are more selective.[5] There is also evidence that IQ’s have been increasing along with memory, despite the shrinking attention spans.[6] Isaiah Hankel, author and speaker, gives nine benefits of shorter attention spans, and a couple stood out to me*. The first being we are more committed, meaning we choose to pay attention to the most important things in our lives.[7] This allows us to stay focused on goals and achieve them. Next, he argues we are connectors.[8] He uses the example of Steve Jobs not being great at engineering, designing, and art, but he brought specialists in those areas together.[9]

Even though I get frustrated at my disability to focus, I know that better technology is ultimately not a bad thing.

 

*Note: This article is a little one-sided, but there were still some useful arguments.

[1] http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2016/03/12/humans-have-shorter-attention-span-than-goldfish-thanks-to-smart/

[2] http://bigthink.com/ideafeed/perhaps-shorter-attention-spans-arent-necessarily-a-bad-thing

[3] Ibid

[4] http://www.firebrandgroup.com/shortattn/

[5] http://www.isaiahhankel.com/short-attention-span

[6] Ibid

[7] Ibid

[8] Ibid

[9] Ibid

Are cookies as sweet as they sound?

To be honest, I never really understood what cookies were until I took an Internet Marketing class. I had always heard of them, usually grouped in with cache and history, but I was not sure exactly what they did. Upon hearing that they could be used to track activity, I was a little scared. Privacy seems to be a big issue in today’s technology-driven world, but I wanted to find out for myself whether cookies should be feared or accepted.

After researching, I have found that cookies bring a lot of convenience into my internet use. One benefit I experience is that cookies store usernames and passwords. This prevents Facebook from requiring me to login every time I click on a link, and Google Chrome remembering my login information so I do not have to type it. [1]

Most cookies do not identify you personally, just data that would be useful for marketing analysis, like browsing activity.[2] The cookie would then be used to bring you more targeted ads based on what you searched the day before.[3]

In my experience, cookies used for advertising can be bothersome. There have been a few times where I was on a website, and an array of shoes popped up that were similar to some I was looking at the day before. At first I found it off-putting and felt my privacy had been invaded, but in reality, it is just companies trying to make more sales. One annoying thing I am dealing with right now are targeted ads popping up on YouTube. For a project in my Internet Marketing class, I researched a web hosting company and frequently visited their site throughout a few days in order to get information. Almost two months later, an ad for their website pops up on almost every YouTube video I watch. And I did not and do not want to use their product, I was just researching!

Although cookies can be obnoxious and violate a small portion of privacy, they can ultimately make the Internet easier to use.

[1] http://www.tomsguide.com/us/-tracking-cookie-definition,news-17506.html

[2] Ibid

[3] Ibid